31 Jul 2016

Quiz 18 10- Questions on what the discoverers of Psychoactive drugs had to say.

Honestly I did not know what to title today's quiz. However, the title will be forgotten but not these quotes.The quiz is admittedly a bit difficult and may require a lot of guess work.

1. It has been used as a pain killer since neolithic times and although Paracelsus did not discover it, he was responsible for its introduction in western medicine where he combined it with gold and pearls. He philosophised " All things are poison and nothing is without poison. The dose alone makes a thing no poison". What?


Paracelsus, Swiss German philosopher, physician, botanist, astrologer, and general occultist. Founder of Toxicology

2. This drug was prepared by Thomas Sydenham by dissolving opium in alcohol and was used to treat pain. The drug was given a Latin name, meaning 'praise'. He described his preparation " Among the remedies which it has pleased Almighty God to give to man to relieve his sufferings, none is so Universally and so efficacious as opium" Which drug did he prepare?

The compound continues to be used today, however it comes it this avatar and is called Opium tincture.

3. First synthesized at Sandoz Laboratory in Switzerland by Albert Hofman, its mental effects were discovered five years later when Hoffman accidentally ingested a small quantity  . He wrote " I was forced to stop my work in the laboratory in the middle of the afternoon and to go home as I was seized by a peculiar restlessness associated with a mild dizziness...characterised by extreme activity of imagination. As I lay in a dazed condition with my eyes closed there surged upon me an uninterrupted stream of fantastic images of extraordinary plasticity and vividness and accompanied by and intense, kaleidoscope like play of colours" Three days later on 19th April, Hofmann intentionally ingested this drug and this day is now known as "Bicycle Day" Which drug?

Albert Hofman.

4. William Brooke  O'Shaughnessy introduced it to western medicine after he studied folk remedies of this psychoactive drug while practising in Calcutta . In 1939 while working with the substance in India he described the following incident " The fourth case of trial was an old muscular coolie, a rheumatic malingerer, and to him half a grain of hemp resin was given in a little spirit. The first day's report will suffice for all. In two hours the old gentleman became talkative and musical, told several stories and sang songs ate the dinner of two persons sought also for other luxuries and finally fell soundly asleep" Which drug?



5. After a lot of testing, he was the first to describe it's mental effect. " I existed in a world of new connection and newly modified ideas. I explained to Dr Kinglake ' nothing exists but thoughts! the universe is composed of impressions, ideas, pleasure and pain.'" His use of the substance did not stop after some trials, infact he developed and addiction to it. He was so fascinated by its psychedelic effects that he did not bother to propagate it and for another 50 years the world was none the wiser about it. He grew so attached to his discovery that he used to use it three to four times a day and eventually in 1829 it killed him. Who and what did he discover?

6. R. Gordon Wasson an amateur mycologist and a photographer were the first white men to record their ingestion. Wasson described it as " a soul -shattering experience. I felt that I was now seeing plain, whereas ordianry vision gives us an imperfect view. I was seeing the archetypes, the platonic ideals, that underlie the imperfect images of everyday life. The thought crossed my mind: could they be the secret that lay behind the ancient mysteries?" What was Wasson describing?

 

Some of the first images of its ingestion and after effects.




7. Gordon Alles synthesized this drug in 1927 and  became the first to study its psychological effects. In 1932 the Benzedrine inhailer was introduced after he noted " its stimulating effect on the central nervous system and its relative lasting effect on oral administration and as an inhalant" . Which drug?

Gordon is also credited with discovering and publishing the psychological effects of methylenedioxyamphetamine (The original ecstasy) .

8. This Cactus is well known for its hallucinogenic effects, used by Native North Americans for spiritual purposes,  and contains at least 28 alkaloids. John Raleigh Briggs,the first to draw scientific attention to this cactus ate one third of it and wrote thus " It is certainly the most violent and rapid of fruits or medicines, known to me. I know of nothing like it except opium and cocaine . The most notable point is the rapidity with which it increases the hearts action. Next, the intoxication and subsequent depression. I think it is well worth the trouble to investigate the matter" Identify the Cactus?

Ken Kesey, while working as a night watchman at a psychiatric ward, was inspired by this cactus to write his novel, 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.'

9. This drug was isolated by Arthur Heffter from the Cactus mentioned in the previous question and wrote about it thus " While reading, green and violet spots appear on the paper. The same occurs when I look up at the bright sky. I have predominantly images of kaleidoscopic figures, patterned carpets and cloth, luxurious articles of clothing and architectural scenes" . Aldous Huxley's book 'The Doors of Perception' deals about his experiences with the drug. Which drug?

(1955, English politician Christopher Mayhew took part in an experiment for BBC's Panorama, in which he ingested 400 mg of this drug and praised the experience, calling it "the most interesting thing I ever did". The show was never aired.)

10. Isolated by Friedrich Wilhelm Adam in 1806, and named after the Greek god of dreams, he reported " In order to subject my previous experiments to a rigorous test, I persuaded three people under the age of 17 to join me in taking it...a response occurred quickly in the three young men and...I shared the same fate. Lying down, I got into a dreamy state." Which alkaloid?

This drug is generally believed to be the first isolation of an active ingredient from a plant and was first marketed commercially by Merk in 1827.

Quiz 17- 10 Questions on Salutes - Answers

1.At the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, Mexico, American track-and-field athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos who finished first and third in the 200-meter race,were expelled from the Olympics, their medals stripped  and  were ejected from the United States team .Why?

Ans:  During award ceremonies Smith and Carlos bowed their heads and gave the Black Power salute of a raised fist during the playing of the national anthem. Both wearing black socks and one black glove each , which symbolised black poverty and black unity in racist America

The athlete who stood second was Australian Peter Norman, what many however do not know is that Norman too showed his solidarity with  Smith and Carlos by wearing an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge.

2.This one on  Switzerland’s most famous folk hero. According to legend, a villainous governor named Gessler was sent by Habsburg authorities to govern the canton of Uri. To proclaim his power, Gessler required passing locals to salute his hat, which had been placed on a pole. When this swiss hero  refused, he was arrested and given a unique punishment which he accomplished but  was arrested again, and  later escaped and killed Gessler—an event that is said to have prompted the Swiss uprising against the Habsburgs. Who?

Ans: William Tell -  He was arrested and ordered to shoot an arrow through an apple resting on his son’s head

3. In April 1971 Soviet union launched  the first space station of any kind it was called Salyut 1 . The name Salyut, which means “salute,” was as a tribute to which well known Russian ?

Ans: Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, the first person in space. Gagarin had been killed in the crash of a jet fighter during a routine training flight in 1968.

4.Robert Baden-Powell was a friend of Rudyard Kipling and used themes from the Jungle book in the Scout movement of which he was the founder. One such gesture is the two finger salute used by cub scout. Which character in the Jungle book is the two finger salute inspired from ?

Ans: Akela the wolf and the wolf pack.  In the The Wolf Cub's Handbook, Baden-Powell wrote: Why two fingers? Well, you know what a Wolf's head looks like with two ears cocked up. It is used as the badge of the Wolf Cub. Your two fingers in the salute are the two ears of the Wolf."
full marks for Wolf or Akela

5. To Remember what did  Lord Wavell, the last but one viceroy of India ,used the  mnemonic "Hot Kippers make Good Breakfast"?

Ans: The five largest Indian states entitled to a 21 gun salute. - Hyderabad, Kashmir, Mysore, Gwalior, and Baroda.

6. Which two sports have a Ten-Bell salute to give honour to a dead sportsman in their respective fields?

Ans: Professional wrestling and Boxing.

7. A traditional salute of the airforce includes a four plane flying  formation when suddenly one plane  ejects out of the formation and disappears  over the horizon. On what occasion is  this salute given?

Ans:This is called a missing man salute or missing  man  formation and is given to a pilot whose plane is crashed and his body not recovered.

8. In the US the  'Pledge of  Allegiance' is an expression of allegiance to the flag of the United States and the republic of the United States of America. It was first given with the arm outstretched and  palm slightly up and was called the Bellamy Salute. Why was it changed to the present day  right hand over the heart ?

Ans: Because outstretched arm with palm slightly up resembled the Nazi party's salute. So the Congress changed it during World War II to the arm across the chest.

 Removal of the Bellamy salute occurred on December 22, 1942

9. During the 1936 Berlin Olympics, other than the United States, which was the only contingent that refused to salute Adolf Hitler ?

Ans: India. The decision not to salute the Fuhrer ideologically stemmed from the anti-Nazi party stand taken by the congress .
The colouful Indian Contingent at the Berlin Games.

10. Members of which  religious group do not  salute the flag of any country  because it is  against their beliefs to show allegiance to any government?

Ans: Jehovah’s Witnesses

24 Jul 2016

Quiz 17- 10 Questions on Salutes

Many theories are put forward with regards to the origin of salute, the most acceptable one being that armored knights raised their visors to identify themselves when they rode past  their king. This custom has become the modern military salute.

1.At the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, Mexico, American track-and-field athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos who finished first and third in the 200-meter race,were expelled from the Olympics, their medals stripped and were ejected from the United States team .Why?

2.This one on Switzerland’s most famous folk hero. According to legend, a villainous governor named Gessler was sent by Habsburg authorities to govern the canton of Uri. To proclaim his power, Gessler required passing locals to salute his hat, which had been placed on a pole. When this swiss hero  refused, he was arrested and given a unique punishment which he accomplished but  was arrested again, and  later escaped and killed Gessler—an event that is said to have prompted the Swiss uprising against the Habsburgs. Who?



3. In April 1971 Soviet union launched  the first space station of any kind it was called Salyut 1 . The name Salyut, which means “salute,” was as a tribute to which well known Russian ?

Salyut docked  with Soyuz 10

4.Robert Baden-Powell was a friend of Rudyard Kipling and used themes from the 'Jungle Book' in the Scout movement of which he was the founder. One such gesture is the two finger salute used by cub scout. Which character in the Jungle book is the two finger salute inspired from ?


5. To Remember what, did  Lord Wavell, the last but one viceroy of India ,used the  mnemonic "Hot Kippers make Good Breakfast"?

Sir Archibald Wavell 

6. Which two sports have a Ten-Bell salute to give honour to a dead sportsman in their respective fields?

7. A traditional salute of the airforce includes a four plane flying  formation when suddenly one plane  ejects out of the formation and disappears  over the horizon. On what occasion is  this salute given?



8. In the US the  'Pledge of  Allegiance' is an expression of allegiance to the flag of the United States and the republic of the United States of America. It was first given with the arm outstretched and  palm slightly up and was called the Bellamy Salute. Why was it changed to the present day  right hand over the heart ?



9. During the 1936 Berlin Olympics, other than the United States, which was the only contingent that refused to salute Adolf Hitler ?


French contingent giving the Nazi Salute.

10. Members of which  religious group do not  salute the flag of any country  because it is  against their beliefs to show allegiance to any government?

Quiz 16 - 10 Questions on Gases of chemical warfare - Answer

1.This war  veteran  took up running as therapy for his lungs, which had been damaged by mustard gas during World War 1. In the 1920 Antwerp Olympic games he managed to beat the favourite Paavo Nurmi in 5,000-metre race and won the Gold. Who?

Ans: Joseph Guillemot

In the same Antwerp games the 10,000 m final was brought forward by almost three hours by the request of King Albert. Guillemot heard it after finishing a very large lunch. Fighting stomach cramps and shoes that were two sizes too big (his own shoes had been stolen), Guillemot had to be satisfied with a silver medal. The strain he underwent ultimately caused him to vomit his food at the award ceremony.

2. The nerve gas Sarin was used in a terrorist attack in a Tokyo subway station in 1995 that killed 12 people and injured more than 5,000. Which cult was responsible for the attack?

Ans: Aum Shinrikyo (Japanese for “Supreme Truth”) . Its founder Chizuo Matsumoto, combined tantric (mystic) yoga, Buddhism, and Daoism (Taoism) with his own vision of Christian prophecy and a belief that disasters would soon befall Japan and offered deliverance from this world to a higher world of Supreme Truth

3. The use of  Gases for  chemical warfare began, when Germany used this gas on April 22, 1915, on fields near Ypres, France against  unprepared Allied lines. At 5 p.m German combat engineers opened 5730 cylinders of this gas and was blown by the wind, towards the allies. Which gas?

Ans: Chlorine Gas.
Although poison gas had been used before, at the Battle of Bolimów three months earlier, the gas had liquified in the cold and become inert.

4. Mustard Gas, is not a gas but a liquid and was invented by Frederick Guthrie in 1860, who reacted Ethylene with Chlorine, and noticed the toxic effects it had on his own skin.Why is it called "Mustard gas"?

Ans: Because the vapours of this chemical, when in impure "agent quality" smells like mustard.



5. This  nerve agent was accidentally discovered by German scientists in 1938 while researching  organophosphate pesticides. The name is an acronym of the discoverers but was never used by Germany. In 1988, Iraq used it against the Kurds and also during the Iranian soldiers. Although banned by the Chemical weapons convention the gas continues to be used in the Syrian Civil war.   Which gas?

Ans: Sarin ( named after its discoverers  Schrader, Ambros, Rudriger and Van der Linde) its chemical  name is O-Isopropyl     methylphosphonofluoridate

6. VX gas was developed in the Porton Down Chemical Weapons Research Centre, Wiltshire, England in 1952 by British chemist Dr. Ranajit Ghosh. The British traded the technology of VX with the United States of America for what?

Ans: For information on thermonuclear weapons. .

7. When Germany was defeated in World war 1, Hitler was lying in a military hospital (1918), what was he hospitalised for?

Ans: Hitler was temporarily blinded by mustard gas. Although recently a few researchers have claimed that Hitler was blinded by a mental disorder known as ‘hysterical blindness' or hysterical amblyopia, a psychiatric disorder that can make sufferers lose their sight.

8.  This nerve gas was the forerunner of all other nerve agents .It is a clear, colourless, tasteless liquid with a faint fruity odour and becomes vapour if heated. Also known as GA it was first developed by Germany as a insecticide in 1936.During the Nuremberg Trials, Albert Speer, testified that he had planned to kill Adolf Hitler in early 1945 by introducing this gas into the Fuhrerbunker ventilation shaft.
During the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, the Iraqi military fired artillery shells filled with this against Iranian infantry.Which nerve agent?

Ans: Tabun.

9. This chemical can be classified as nerve gas itself, but is a suitable antidote to VX gas.This poisonous alkaloid is obtained from plants of the Nightshade family. It is also used medically to stop spasms and cosmetically to dilate the pupils of the eyes (Used by Cleopatra in the hope that she would appear more alluring ) . Which alkaloid?

Ans: Atropine
Atropine is on the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system. Naturally present in Plants like Mandrake.

10. During the Nazi period this company  took over chemical companies in German-occupied territories, used slave labor in many of its plants, and produced the Zyklon-B gas used for the mass murder of Jews and others. Some of its directors, were convicted of war crimes in 1947. During the war the US government auctioned off all of its American assets, including its name and the name of one of its famous product.These remained outside the company's control until it bought them back from SmithKline Beecham in 1994. Which company?

Ans: Bayer AG , their most famous product being Aspirin. Discovered by Felix Hoffman, a Bayer employee

17 Jul 2016

Quiz 16- 10 Questions on Gases of chemical warfare

Introduction: Nerve gas works by blocking the body’s production of an enzyme called cholinesterase. This allows the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to build up in the body. When this happens, muscles contract but cannot relax. Victims suffer from headaches, runny nose, narrowing of the pupils, and a tightened chest, uncontrollable muscle contractions occur and quickly lead to death by asphyxiation.

1.This war  veteran  took up running as therapy for his lungs, which had been damaged by mustard gas during World War 1. In the 1920 Antwerp Olympic games he managed to beat the favourite Paavo Nurmi in 5,000-metre race and won the Gold. Who?

2. The nerve gas Sarin was used in a terrorist attack in a Tokyo subway station in 1995 that killed 12 people and injured more than 5,000. Which cult was responsible for the attack?



3.  The use of  Gases for  chemical warfare began, when Germany used this gas on April 22, 1915, on fields near Ypres, France against  unprepared Allied lines. At 5 p.m German combat engineers opened 5730 cylinders of this gas and was blown by the wind, towards the allies. Which gas?

4. Mustard Gas, is not a gas but a liquid and was invented by Frederick Guthrie in 1860, who reacted Ethylene with Chlorine, and noticed the toxic effects it had on his own skin.Why is it called "Mustard gas"?

5.  This  nerve agent was accidentally discovered by German scientists in 1938 while researching  organophosphate pesticides. The name is an acronym of the discoverers but was never used by Germany. In 1988, Iraq used it against the Kurds and also during the Iranian soldiers. Although banned by the Chemical weapons convention the gas continues to be used in the Syrian Civil war.   Which gas?


6. VX gas was developed in the Porton Down Chemical Weapons Research Centre, Wiltshire, England in 1952 by British chemist Dr. Ranajit Ghosh. The British traded the technology of VX with the United States of America for what?

7. When Germany was defeated in World war 1, Hitler was lying in a military hospital (1918), what was he hospitalised for?

8.  This nerve gas was the forerunner of all other nerve agents .It is a clear, colourless, tasteless liquid with a faint fruity odour and becomes vapour if heated. Also known as GA it was first developed by Germany as a insecticide in 1936.During the Nuremberg Trials, Albert Speer, testified that he had planned to kill Adolf Hitler in early 1945 by introducing this gas into the Fuhrerbunker ventilation shaft.
During the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, the Iraqi military fired artillery shells filled with this against Iranian infantry.Which agent?


9. This chemical can be classified as nerve gas itself, but is a suitable antidote to VX gas.This poisonous alkaloid is obtained from plants of the Nightshade family. It is also used medically to stop spasms and cosmetically to dilate the pupils of the eyes (Used by Cleopatra in the hope that she would appear more alluring ) . Which alkaloid?

One eye dilated by the alkaloid. 

10. During the Nazi period this company  took over chemical companies in German-occupied territories, used slave labor in many of its plants, and produced the Zyklon-B gas used for the mass murder of Jews and others. Some of its directors, were convicted of war crimes in 1947. During the war the US government auctioned off all of its American assets, including its name and the name of one of its famous product.These remained outside the company's control until it bought them back from SmithKline Beecham in 1994. Which company?

Quiz 15- 10 questions on moustache- Answers

The French military, the Prussian guard, and the Hussars sported the mustache in the early 19th century but in 1838 the king of Bavaria forbade the wearing of mustaches in his military.

1. What was  the coded-signal used by the French Resistance in WWII to mobilize their forces once the Allies had landed on the Normandy beaches. ?

Ans: "John has a long moustache"

2. In the so called good old days, in the district of Kodagu (Coorg) in Karnataka, only certain people were allowed to  grow a huge moustache called "galla meeshe" (A kind of handle bar moustache). If you had to were one what would you have to do?

Ans:Hunt down or kill a tiger.

3. There is a 1 in 4 chance that you will get this one right - In a pack of standard playing cards, which is the only king without a moustache?

Ans: King of Hearts.


4. What type of moustache are named after, A Mexican revolutionary hero who rose up against President Porfirio Díaz and enjoyed an enormous following because of his ideas regarding agrarian reform. He with  Pancho Villa, occupied Mexico City in 1914. and  was assassinated in 1919 by an agent of President Venustiano Carranza.?

Ans: Zapata ( a thick mustache that curves down around the edges of the mouth) Named for Emiliano Zapata , who wore such a mustache


Zapata in 1914.

5. Perhaps every Chinese villain in a Hollywood or a Bollywood movie has this moustache (or a stereotyped Oriental) . Many think that it is similar to the Horseshoe (Right one in the photograph) moustache, but it is not and is extremely difficult to grow one. Unlike the horseshoe, the hair is grown only from the upper lip and hangs down either side of the mouth—but the sides remain clean-shaven.  The stereotyping started  in a 1929 film starring Warner Oland and the moustache gets its name from the Villain in the movie who sported it. Either Name the move or the moustache.

Ans: Fu Manchu , from the movie 'The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu'.The 1965 Christoper Lee movie was  'The Face of Fu Manchu'

6.  " Moustache taken off , grown a beard " was one of the line in a message sent from the ship SS Montrose in 1910 and led to the arrest of Dr.Crippen while fleeing to Canada on board that ship. This is the first recorded case of an arrest because of what?

Ans: Wireless Telegraph. Wireless telegraphy was a new invention then and was being fitted on ships. The message was sent by the Captain of SS Montrose, who suspected that two of the passengers were murder suspects on the run. His suspicion turned out correct and led to the arrest of Dr. Crippen, who had killed his wife.

7. In which book does  Hercule Poirot the detective created by Agatha Christe shaves  off one of  his proudest possessions, his moustache in order to pretend as his brother Achille Poirot.?

Ans: The Big Four.

8. Think really hard and you should get this one- The word ' MOUSTACHE' originated in the  Late 16th century via French from Italian word 'mostaccio' which was ultimately derived from the Greek word ' mustax ' meaning “upper lip, moustache.” The Greek word had its origins in Indo-European base where its meaning was  “chew,”. Which English word meaning ' to chew' has a similar ancestor as Moustache ?

Ans: Masticate. ( Mid-17th century word . Via the past participle of Latin masticare from Greek mastikhan “to grind the teeth")

9. The only way to differentiate between these two twins is by their moustache. One  has a straight moustache while the others  is slightly twisted. which famous fictional twins?

Ans: Thompson and  Thomson of the Tintin comics fame ( Thompson has a straight moustache while Thomson's is slightly twisted)

There was a small error in this question. As Harman pointed out, Thompson and Thomson are not twins. They are unrelated to each other ! Apologies for the error , I have fired my proof reader and given points to all participants.


Thompson (left) and Thomson (right),

10. Identify the movie from its most memorable dialogue. 
"Munchhen hon to Natthulal jaisi, warna na hon" (Mostaches should be like Natthulal's or shouldn't be at all)

Ans: Sharaabi

10 Jul 2016

Quiz 15- 10 questions on moustache

Ah! for some of you who wondered on why the moustache was kept out of the previous quiz- Here is the answer. So that we could quiz on them this week :)

Romans considered the Gauls' wearing of mustaches with no beards to be the epitome of barbarism

1. What was  the coded-signal used by the French Resistance in WWII to mobilize their forces once the allies had landed on the Normandy beaches. ? (You can give me the English translation)

2. In the so called good old days, in the district of Kodagu (Coorg) in Karnataka, only certain people were allowed to  grow a huge moustache called "galla meeshe" (A kind of handle bar moustache). If you had to were one what would you have to do?

3. There is a 1 in 4 chance that you will get this one right - In a pack of standard playing cards, which is the only king without a moustache?

4. What type of moustache are named after a Mexican revolutionary hero who rose up against President Porfirio Díaz and enjoyed an enormous following because of his ideas regarding agrarian reform. He with  Pancho Villa, occupied Mexico City in 1914. and  was assassinated in 1919 by an agent of President Venustiano Carranza.?

5. Perhaps every Chinese villain in a Hollywood or a Bollywood movie has this moustache (or a stereotyped Oriental) . Many think that it is similar to the Horseshoe (Right one in the photograph) moustache, but it is not and is extremely difficult to grow one. Unlike the horseshoe, the hair is grown only from the upper lip and hangs down either side of the mouth—but the sides remain clean-shaven.  The stereotyping started  in a 1929 film starring Warner Oland and the moustache gets its name from the Villain in the movie who sported it. Either name the move or the moustache.


The photograph on the left is from a 1965 Christopher Lee starer and both the 1929 movie and the 1965 one has the name of the moustache in its titles.  

6.  " Moustache taken off , grown a beard " was one of the line in a message sent from the ship SS Montrose in 1910 and led to the arrest of Dr.Crippen while fleeing to Canada on board that ship. This is the first recorded case of an arrest because of what?

7. In which book does  Hercule Poirot the detective created by Agatha Christie shaves off one of  his proudest possessions, his moustache, in order to pretend to be his brother Achille Poirot.?

8. Think really hard and you should get this one- The word ' MOUSTACHE' originated in the  Late 16th century via French from Italian word 'mostaccio' which was ultimately derived from the Greek word ' mustax ' meaning “upper lip, moustache.” The Greek word had its origins in Indo-European base where its meaning was  “chew,”. Which English word meaning ' to chew' has a similar ancestor as Moustache ?

9. The only way to differentiate between these two twins is by their moustache. One  has a straight moustache while the others  is slightly twisted. which famous fictional twins?

10. Identify the movie from its most memorable dialogue.
"Munchhen hon to Natthulal jaisi, warna na hon" (Mostaches should be like Natthulal's or shouldn't be at all)
video

Quiz 14- 10 questions on facial hair other than moustache - Answers

1.According to the Roman historian Pliny the Elder, Roman general Scipio Africanus the Elder, was the first Roman to do what, which today for most of us  is a everyday routine?

Ans:  First Roman to shave every day.



2. Which Russian Emperor passed a law making shaving compulsory and for  those who persisted in wearing a beard, were taxed in proportion to their rank?

Ans: Peter the Great in 1705. In 1535, King Henry VIII of England, who wore a beard himself, introduced a tax on beards. His daughter, Elizabeth I of England, reintroduced the beard tax, taxing every beard of more than two weeks' growth.

3.  Ambrose Burnside  a Union general during the U.S. Civil War, allowed whiskers to grow on the sides of his face while shaving his chin, a style that was named after him. Which word  today is derived from this style ?

Ans: Sideburns , They  was  known as “burnsides,” after his name, and later came to be called sideburns.



4. According to the Greek historian Herodotus, in ancient Egypt when a dog died everyone in the house would shave their whole body as well as their head. Similarly what did they have to shave when a cat died?

Ans: Shave their eyebrows.

5. According to my Oxford dictionary Vibrissae means 1. Long stiff hairs growing around the mouth or elsewhere on the face of many mammals. Ex Whiskers.
or Coarse bristle- like feathers growing around the gape of certain insectivorous birds that catch insects in flight.
The term Vibrissae however was used in a different context in the 17th Century and meant a particular type of hair. What hair in a Human body was Vibrissae originally ?

Ans: Nasal hair or nose hair.

6. In Kathakali, The personality trait of a character in the play are indicated by the colour of the beard. The faces of gods, heroes, and kings are always painted green and they have white beard (Vela tatti). Schemers are indicated by black beard (Karutta tati). What coloured beard do the daemons wear?

Ans: Red

Cuvanna tati.

7. Grace Bedell, age 11,suggested  Abraham  Lincoln to do something and  in return she would try to get her four brothers to vote for him as president. Lincoln won the election in November and followed up with Bedell's suggestion. What did he do?

Ans: He grew a beard.


8. According to the Guinness Book of world records, what record does Anthony Victor from Madurai hold (held since 2007) ?

Ans: He has the Longest ear Hair.


9. Which island nation got  its name from the Portuguese word for 'bearded' because of its numerous moss-hung fig-trees?

Ans: Barbados

10. 1977, many US newspapers carried a news clip like this (this one from the Pittsburgh post archived on Google news) about Mark Traynor's eyebrow choices. Whose eyebrows beat that of Elizabeth Taylor and were chosen the "Most expressive and most intelligent" ?

Ans: Lassie.



3 Jul 2016

Quiz 14- 10 questions on facial hair other than moustache

These questions are certainly not for people who suffer from 'Pogonophobia' or fear of  Beards. It will be like a horror story to them.

1.According to the Roman historian Pliny the Elder, Roman general Scipio Africanus the Elder, was the first Roman to do what, which today for most of us  is a everyday routine?

2. Which Russian Emperor passed a law making shaving compulsory and for  those who persisted in wearing a beard, were taxed in proportion to their rank?

A Russian beard token from 1705, carried to indicate that the owner had paid the beard tax .

3.Ambrose Burnside  a Union general during the U.S. Civil War, allowed whiskers to grow on the sides of his face while shaving his chin, a style that was named after him. Which word  today is derived from this style ?

4. According to the Greek historian Herodotus, in ancient Egypt when a dog died everyone in the house would shave their whole body as well as their head. Similarly what did they have to shave when a cat died?

5. According to my Oxford dictionary Vibrissae means 1. Long stiff hairs growing around the mouth or elsewhere on the face of many mammals. Ex Whiskers.
or Coarse bristle- like feathers growing around the gape of certain insectivorous birds that catch insects in flight.
The term Vibrissae however was used in a different context in the 17th Century and meant a particular type of hair. What hair in a Human body was Vibrissae originally ?

6. In Kathakali, The personality trait of a character in the play are indicated by the colour of the beard. The faces of gods, heroes, and kings are always painted green and they have white beard (Vela tatti). Schemers are indicated by black beard (Karutta tati). What coloured beard do the daemons wear?





7. Grace Bedell, age 11,suggested  Abraham  Lincoln to do something and  in return she would try to get her four brothers to vote for him as president. Lincoln won the election in November and followed up with Bedell's suggestion. What did he do?  

8. According to the Guinness Book of world records, what record does Anthony Victor from Madurai hold (held since 2007) ?

9. Which island nation got its name from the Portuguese word for 'bearded' because of its numerous moss-hung fig-trees?

10. 1977, many US newspapers carried a news clip like this (this one from the Pittsburgh post archived on Google news) about Mark Traynor's eyebrow choices. Whose eyebrows beat that of Elizabeth Taylor and were chosen the "Most expressive and most intelligent" ?


Quiz 13- 10 Questions on waste and garbage - Answers

Introduction: "The biggest waste of water in the country by far. You spend half a pint and flush two gallons." (Referring to toilets)
Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh British consort of Queen Elizabeth II.

1. What is Kitchen Midden?

Ans: A pre-historic refuse heap left at the site of a camp or village.  Such heaps, often containing buried relics and help in  investigations of cultures that left no written records  or permanent architectural remains

2. Marpol Annex 5, governs / regulates the discharge and disposal of whose garbage or Garbage from where?

Ans : Garbage from Ships and off-shore installations.

3. 3. This is perhaps the most printed logo/ clipart ever (IMHO). You can perhaps see it in most packing and packaging. No one is really sure who actually designed it, but what is it called ?

Ans: Tidyman .

4. On August 31, 1986, the cargo ship Khian Sea, was loaded with more than 14,000 tons of ash from waste incinerators in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The operators of Khian sea intended to dump the ash in the Bahamas. However, the Bahamian government turned the ship away, and Philadelphia withheld payment to the companies because the waste was not disposed of. Over the next 16 months, Khian Sea tried to dump its cargo in Dominican Republic, Honduras, Panama, Bermuda, Guinea Bissau and the Dutch Antilles and in January 1988, the crew finally dumped 4,000 tons of the waste near Gonaïves in Haiti as "topsoil fertilizer". When Greenpeace informed the Haitian government of the origin of the waste the ship slipped away.
Next the crew of Khian Sea tried to unload the rest of the cargo in Senegal, Morocco, Yugoslavia, Sri Lanka and Singapore. After repairs in Yugoslavia, the ship's name was changed to Felicia, and then Pelicano. But these changes failed to hide the ship's original identity.
One day in November of 1988 the rest of the ash disappeared when the ship was en route from Singapore to Sri Lanka. Eventually the ship's captain admitted that they had dumped the remaining 10,000 tons of the waste into the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Over the years, various attempts to return the ash dumped in Haiti failed.
Greenpeace and Haitian environmental groups launched a "Project Return to Sender" and in April 2000, 2,500 tons of ash and contaminated soil was shipped to Florida and in June 2002 that waste was moved to Mountain View Reclamation Landfill, in Franklin County, Pennsylvania near Antrim Township.

The case contributed to the creation of which Convention in 1989 to Control the Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal and is Named after a place in Switzerland?

Ans: Basel Convention.

5. The study of this natural phenomenon picked up momentum after Peruvians engaged in mining and exporting guano (phosphate-rich bird droppings used as fertilizer) observed that the occurrence of this created problems for guano-mining enterprises. During this phenomenon, guano-producing seabirds would mysteriously perish in great numbers, their carcasses washing up on shore in the millions followed by the  reduction in the amount of guano available along the Peruvian coast. The guano thus inspired the study of which phenomenon?

Ans: El Nino effect.

6.  It's existence was predicted in a 1988 paper published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States, and discovered in 1997 by Capt. Charles J. Moore on his return from the Transpacific Yacht Race. Today a total of 4 have been discovered in our oceans. What am I talking about ?

Ans: Garbage Gyre/ Garbage patches in the oceans. The Great Pacific garbage patch, is a gyre (Vortex) of marine debris particles in the central North Pacific Ocean and was first predicted in 1988. Since then similar such garbage patches have been discovered. The North Atlantic Garbage patch, Indian Ocean garbage patch and Mediterranean Sea Garbage Patch

Source : National Geographic.

7. It was invented by Harry Wasylyk  a Canadian inventor and Larry Hansen of Lindsay, Ontario, who worked for the Union Carbide Company there . They were first intended for commercial use and were first sold to the Winnipeg General Hospital. Union Carbide then bought the invention from Wasylyk and Hansen and first manufactured it under the name Glad, for home use in the late 1960s. Which product?

Ans:Green plastic garbage bag (made from polyethylene). Since their invention, plastic garbage bags have been filling our landfills and unfortunately most plastics take up to one thousand years to decompose.

8.  Among many things Fred Lawrence Whipple is well known for, two things take the cake. He proposed the "Dirty snowball" theory for comets (i.e. comets were icy objects containing some dust and rock ) and the other is for designing the Whipple Shield. What is the Whipple shield used for ?

Ans: Whipple Shield is an impact shield used to protect manned and unmanned spacecraft from collisions with orbital debris/ Space garbage (also  micrometeoroids ).

Whipple shield used on NASA's Stardust probe

9. Lillian Moller Gilbreth, the mother of 12 children, was a pioneer in ergonomics, Gilbreth patented many devices, including an electric food mixer, shelves for refrigerator door and which other household device which helps to make our garbage disposal a wee bit easy?

Ans: Trash can with step-on lid-opener (pedal operated garbage bin)

10. He was a great writer and philosopher. One of his best selling epic poem "Henriade" was written in the Bastille prison, where he spent 11 months for writing poems against the regent. After his death, in 1778 he was secretly buried in a abbey in Champagne. In 1791 the remains were bought to Paris and buried in the Pantheon. In 1814 after the Bourbon restoration , his remains were stolen and dumped in a garbage heap by right ultras. Which author?

Ans: Voltaire